Categorie: boek

Appendix 7: Sample Issue log


Project name: <enter project name>
Date: <enter date of last changes>
Owner: <enter name of the person who administers this document>


Nr. Type Issue description Name Date Priority Decision Status
1 RFC Enter a brief description of the issue that arose 1= high 3= low Describe the decision here ok
DS T = accepted
Q A= rejected
C U = postponed until…
R

 

Type Priority Decision Status
RFC= Request for change (general) 1 = Immediate action A = Accepted OK = Issue has been resolved
AS = afwijking van specificatie (t.o.v. ontwerp) 2 = Take action later R = Rejected Open = Awaiting resolution
 Q= Question 3 = No action P = Postponed until…(Date/event)
C = Concern
R = Risk

Appendix 8: Sample Risk log


Project name: <Enter project name>
Date: <enter date of last changes>
Owner: <enter name of the person who administers this document>


Nr. Description of risk Priority Measure Status
1 Enter a brief description of the perceived risk 1= high 3= low Describe the measures that were taken ok

 

Describe the measures that were taken Status
1 = take immediate action OK = Risk has been resolved.
2 = take action later open = awaiting action
3 = take no action

Appendix 9: Sample meeting report


Minutes of Project: <Enter project name>
Date: <enter the date of the conversation/meeting>
Note-taker: <enter the name of the person who prepared this document>
Present: <enter the names of those who were present for this discussion>
Absent with notice: <enter the names of those who were absent with notice>
Absent without notice: <enter the names of those who were absent without notice>


Agenda

<Enter the list of topics as they appeared on the agenda during the meeting. For example:>

  1. Approval of the minutes from the previous meeting
  2. Discussion of action list
  3. Discussion of decision list
  4. Discussion of issue log
  5. Discussion of risk log (new risks and obstacles)
  6. Project progress
  7. Schedule adjustments
  8. Consultation with management
  9. Question round
  1. Approval of minutes from previous meeting
    Piet remarked that his comments concerning the developments of new software by the competition were not accurately recorded in the report. He will send a brief e-mail to the note-taker with a correct reflection of his ideas. The others in attendance approved the minutes.
  2.  Action list
    A number of actions were cancelled, and other new actions were reported.
    Please refer to the separate document entitled ActionsAndDecisions.doc
  3. Decision list
    Please refer to the separate action-and-decision list for information on the decisions that were taken.
    Please refer to the separate document entitled ActionsAndDecisions.doc
  4. Issue log
    Please refer to the separate issue log for information on the issues that are currently awaiting action.
    No new issues were reported this week.
  5. Risk log
    HHenk has learned of a new risk that we had overlooked. What should we do if our software supplier declares bankruptcy? This risk has been noted in the risk log. Klaas will consider the matter further and see what our contracts with the supplier say in this regard.
    Please refer to the risk log for further information.
  6. Project progress
    Partner 1
    The Java wing is working hard to realise the software. Three engineers are now assigned to the project.
    The testers are working to prepare the test scripts. Henk asked Marie whether he had sent this to Floor. Kees reported that the plans for detail testing are not deliverables. The test scripts are, however, if the partner wishes insight into the plans in question. This is obviously always possible.Partner 2
    Floor reported that she is now working on a new name for the product. Henk will go ahead and prepare a change proposal that will explain the impact of this change on the project. The estimate for licenses has now been received from the supplier.
    Floor remarked that she would like to submit another report to the financer in early October. We agreed to submit the report to the partner five working days after the end of September.

    Participants in the previous period

    Name Position
    Piet Pieterse Operations manager
    Jan Jansen Project leader
    Etc. Lead Engineer Client PRODUCT
    Technical Architect
    Lead Engineer Server PRODUCT
    Java Engineer
    Quality/Testing manager
    Testing Coordinator

    Participants in the coming period

    Name Position
    Klaas Klaaszoon Operations manager
    Marie de Boer Project leader
    Etc. Lead Engineer Client PRODUCT
    Technical Architect
    Lead Engineer Server PRODUCT
    Java Engineer
    Java Engineer
    Java Engineer
    Java Engineer
    Quality/Testing manager
    Testing Coordinator
    Tester
  7. Schedule adjustments
    The chart below reflects the new schedule, which the current project partners consider realistic at this time.

    Phase/Milestone Starting date/Milestone Ending date Who
    Preparation 7-4-03 6-6-2003 Partner1
    Design 7-4-03 6-6-2003 Partner1 + partner2
    Decision-making 10-6-2003 13-6-2003 Partner1 + partner2
    Design approval 13-6-2003 13-6-2003 Partner2
    Implementation/Testing 30-6-2003 28-11-2003 Partner1
    Delivery of first version 28-11-2003 28-11-2003 Partner1
    Test of acceptance 1-12-2003 2-01-2004 Partner2
    Support for acceptance test 1-12-2003 2-01-2004 Partner1
    Acceptance 2-01-2004 2-01-2004 Partner2
    Substantive user test 2-01-2004 25-06-2003 Partner2
    Support for substantive user test 2-01-2004 25-06-2003 Partner1
    Optimisation 28-06-2003 27-08-2003 Partner1
    Delivery of second version 27-08-2003 27-08-2003 Partner1
    Guarantee 27-08-2003 26-11-2004 Partner1
  8. Consultation with management
    In his role as project leader, Klaas had consulted with management. Management would like the project to be completed within one month, or two at the most. Klaas reported that he did not consider this feasible, but that the team would do its best to make it (the impossible) possible.
  9. Question round
    Marie remarked that the meeting had already lasted for two hours, even though the goal had been to limit it to forty-five minutes. She asked everyone to try to keep the meetings short.Henk states that he will be unable to attend the next meeting.

Next meeting(s)

Progress conference
weekly
Tuesday 19 augustus 2006
13:00 uur
Partner 1, Rotterdam office
Klaas, Henk, Floor, Marie
Henk


Tentative agenda:

  1. Meeting report from previous meeting
  2. Action list
  3. Decision list
  4. Deviations from specifications
  5. Project progress
  6. Scheduling (milestones/changes)
  7. Overwork/underwork
  8. Issue log
  9. Risks and obstacles
  10. Other matters/Question round

Appendix (appendices)

Action/Decision list for the Project
Issue log
Risk log

Appendix 10: Sample project plan

<project name>

Project name: <enter project name>
Date: <enter date of last changes>
Project leader: <enter name(s) of project leader(s)>
development phase: <one of the following: initiation phase, definition phase, design phase, development phase, implementation phase or follow-up phase>

For approval: <name + signature of project leader>

Date:

For approval: <name + signature of client>

Date:


 

Introduction:

This document is a brief instruction book for compiling a project plan. The first project plan is developed after the initiation phase and serves as an approval document for the entire project. After each phase, this document must be revised. A detailed plan must be developed for the next phase. For the subsequent phases, the plan will be of a more global nature. Evaluation of this document also takes place after each phase.

General information about the project

  1. Situation sketch and problem definition of the project
    • Provide a brief description of the organisation in which the project will take place.
    • Provide a brief description of the department(s) in which the project will take place.
    • Provide a brief description of any relationships between this project and any others.
    • Provide a brief description of the history of this project.
    • Provide a brief description of the catalyst for this project.
    • Identify the client(s) for this project.
    • Identify the contractor for this project.
  2. Project assignment
    • Explain the rationale for this project; follow the SMART formula as closely as possible. (SMART=specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, timely).
    • Identify what will be delivered.
    • Identify the most important boundaries of the project (what will not happen).
  3. Risk analysis
    • Identify the risks that are known in this project.
    • Specify how these risks will be handled (avoiding, fighting, insuring, accepting)
  4. Organisation of the project
    This section of the project plan provides a description of the phases, activities in each phase and the associated control factors of the project. The plan is elaborated globally for the more remote phases and in concrete and specific terms for the next phase. This sample begins from the compilation of the initial project plan and thus with the initiation phase. This section of the project plan should be revised after each phase.

    1. Explanation of the project/management model that will be applied
      This project plan is based on the waterfall method/DANS method <select one of the models here>, which is described in the DANS Handbook for Project Management. The handbook is included with this project plan.

      1. Initiation phase
        This project plan is the result of the initiation phase. This phase requires no further detailed elaboration. A summary of the activities that have taken place in preparation may be included.
      2. Definition phase
        Planned starting date: <date>
        Planned ending date: <date>Description of the result of the definition phase:

        A list of requirements concerning the project result will be compiled in the definition phase.

        Most important milestones: <(example)>

        • List of functional requirements
        • Research on legal requirements
        • Requirements from interviews with end users
        • Requirements from end-user tests
        • Report of technical requirements
        • Client approval of list of requirements

        <Specify when each milestone will be accomplished and who is responsible. Specify the required quality for each milestone (intermediate product).>

        Activities in the definition phase:
        Provide a list of the activities that must take place in order to achieve the milestones. Specify who will carry out these activities, when and by whom they will be approved (ultimate responsibility).

        Timeline:
        Include a chronological list of activities using a bar graph or similar visual aid. Provide a clear indication of the timing of all milestones. Do not forget to include margins.

        Budget:
        Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. In addition, specify the costs for materials and supplies, as well as any other costs. Refer as necessary to external documents that specify the costs (see also the separate model for budgets).

        Internal information:
        Indicate how the information from this phase will be recorded and archived. Specify any resources that will be used and, if necessary, who will or will not have access to this information.

        External information:
        The approval of this phase by the client/customer is an important information moment. Indicate the reports that must be submitted to the client, customer or external management after this phase.

      3. Design phase
        Planned starting date: <date>
        Planned ending date: <date>Description of the result of the design phase:
        A (number of) design(s) for the intended project result will be made in the design phase.

        Most important milestones: <(example)>
        One or more dummies
        Screen design
        Photo impressions/sketches

        <Specify when each milestone will be accomplished and who is responsible. Specify the required quality for each milestone (intermediate product).>

        Activities in the design phase:
        Provide a list of the activities that must take place in order to achieve the milestones. Specify who will carry out these activities, when and by whom they will be approved (ultimate responsibility).

        Timeline:
        Include a chronological list of activities using a bar graph or similar visual aid. Provide a clear indication of the timing of all milestones. Do not forget to include margins.

        Cost estimates:
        Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. In addition, specify the costs for materials and supplies, as well as any other costs. Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. As necessary, refer to an external document that contains the costs. Do not forget to include a category of ‘unexpected costs’ and the costs of project management itself (also see the separate model for budgets). As necessary, refer to an external document that contains the costs (also see the separate model for budgets).

        Internal information:
        Indicate how the information from this phase will be recorded and archived. Specify any resources that will be used and, if necessary, who will or will not have access to this information.

        External information:
        The approval of this phase by the client/customer is an important information moment. Indicate the reports that must be submitted to the client, customer or external management after this phase.

        After the design phase, the waterfall method continues with the development phase; the DANS method for software development continues with the cyclical section. The various possibilities are described together below. One of the two options must be chosen for the preparation of a project plan.

      4. Development phase <(Waterfall only)>
        Planned starting date: <date>
        Planned ending date: <date>
        Description of the result of the development phase:
        During the development phase, an action plan will be developed in preparation for the implementation phase <Note: This phase is not always necessary for every project. Particularly for smaller projects, this phase may be omitted.>Most important milestones: <(example)>
        Action plan, Part 1
        Action plan, Part 2
        etc.

        <Specify when each milestone will be accomplished and who is responsible. Specify the required quality for each milestone (intermediate product).>

        Activities in the development phase:
        Provide a list of the activities that must take place in order to achieve the milestones. Specify who will carry out these activities, when and by whom they will be approved (ultimate responsibility).

        Timeline:
        Include a chronological list of activities using a bar graph or similar visual aid. Provide a clear indication of the timing of all milestones. Do not forget to include margins.

        Cost estimates:
        Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. As necessary, refer to an external document that contains the costs. Do not forget to include a category of ‘unexpected costs’ and the costs of project management itself (also see the separate model for budgets).

        Internal information:
        Indicate how the information from this phase will be recorded and archived. Specify any resources that will be used and, if necessary, who will or will not have access to this information.

        External information:
        The approval of this phase by the client/customer is an important information moment. Indicate the reports that must be submitted to the client, customer or external management after this phase.

      5. Implementation phase <(waterfall only)>
        Planned starting date: <date>
        Planned ending date: <date>
        Description of the result of the implementation phase:
        The project result will be built in the implementation phase.Most important milestones: <(example)>
        Element 1 of the implementation
        Element 2 of the implementation
        etc.

        <Specify when each milestone will be accomplished and who is responsible. Specify the required quality for each milestone (intermediate product).>

        Activities in the implementation phase:
        Provide a list of the activities that must take place in order to achieve the milestones. Specify who will carry out these activities, when and by whom they will be approved (ultimate responsibility).

        Timeline:
        Include a chronological list of activities using a bar graph or similar visual aid. Provide a clear indication of the timing of all milestones. Do not forget to include margins.

        Cost estimates:
        Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. In addition, specify the costs for materials and supplies, as well as any other costs. As necessary, refer to an external document that contains the costs (also see the separate model for budgets).

        Internal information:
        Indicate how the information from this phase will be recorded and archived. Specify any resources that will be used and, if necessary, who will or will not have access to this information.

        External information:
        The approval of this phase by the client/customer is an important information moment. Indicate the reports that must be submitted to the client, customer or external management after this phase.

      6. Cyclical phase <(only the DANS method for software development)>
        Planned starting date: <date>
        Planned ending date: <date>
        Description of the result of the implementation phase:
        During the cyclical phase, the project result will be further examined, specified and built.Number of hours available for the cyclical phase:
        Indicate how many hours are available for the cyclical phase, possibly distributed over the various team members, if the distribution is not equal.

        Preliminary estimate of the number of cycles and their products <(example)>
        Cycle 1: basic architecture
        Cycle 2: interaction between servers
        Cycle 3: interaction with customer
        etc.

        This section is important primarily for compiling the initial project plan. As the cyclical phase approaches, the planning system shifts to the use of story cards (see DANS Handbook for Project Management).

        Participants in the cyclical phase:
        Provide a list of participants in the cyclical phase and their responsibilities:
        <example>

        Jan Jansen: Programmer
        Piet Pietersen: Programmer
        Marie Pedro Del Mar: Programmer
        Kees Keeszoon: Designer (interaction and graphics)
        Client: Process information and testing
        etc.

        Cost estimates:
        Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. In addition, specify the costs for materials and supplies, as well as any other costs. As necessary, refer to an external document that contains the costs (also see the separate model for budgets).

        Internal information:
        Indicate how the information from this phase will be recorded and archived. Specify any resources that will be used and, if necessary, who will or will not have access to this information. <Story cards will be used, possibly supplemented with a project log, CVS system, bug tracker and tools (e.g. Xplanner>.

        External information:
        The approval of this phase by the client/customer is an important information moment. Indicate the reports that must be submitted to the client, customer or external management after this phase.

      7. Follow-up phase <(waterfall and DANS method for software development)>
        Planned starting date: <date>
        Planned ending date: <date>Note: Provide a clear indication of when evaluation will end in the project team.

        Description of the result of the evaluation phase:
        The project will be completed during the follow-up phase. Indicate what is and is not included in completion.

        Most important milestones: <(example)>
        Project report
        Transfer document for administrative organisation
        Project website with user information
        etc.

        <Specify when each milestone will be accomplished and who is responsible. Specify the required quality for each milestone (intermediate product).>

        Activities in the follow-up phase:
        Provide a list of the activities that must take place in order to achieve the milestones. Specify who will carry out these activities, when and by whom they will be approved (ultimate responsibility).

        Timeline:
        Include a chronological list of activities using a bar graph or similar visual aid. Provide a clear indication of the timing of all milestones. Do not forget to include margins.

        Cost estimates:
        Provide an estimate of the costs for each activity in this phase. In addition, specify the costs for materials and supplies, as well as any other costs. Refer as necessary to external documents that specify the costs (also see the separate model for budgets).

        Internal information:
        Indicate how the information from this phase will be recorded and archived. Specify any resources that will be used and, if necessary, who will or will not have access to this information.

        External information:
        The approval of this phase by the client/customer is an important information moment. Indicate the reports that must be submitted to the client, customer or external management after this phase.

Overview

The final section of the project plan provides an overview of the costs and the timeline for the entire project.

Phase Expected starting date Expected date of completion Total cost estimate
Definition      
Design      
Preparation      
Implementation      
Follow-up      
       
    Total  

Appendix 11: Sample budget

Budget
<Project name>
<Project phase: initiation – evaluation >
<Name of the person compiling this document >
<date>
Amount in Euros
 
Initiation phase Who? Hours Fee Total
 
Research draft Project Leader 20 75 1500
Consultation with partners Project Leader 10 75 750
Preparation of project proposal Department Head 40 80 3200
Proposal design Graphic Design 10 50 500
Contract expertise     1000 1000
       
subtotal initiation phase: 6950
Definition phase
 
Consultation with end users Project Leader 10 75 750
  Functional Designer 10 65 650
Consultation with experts Project Leader 20 75 1500
  Functional Designer 30 65 1950
  Internal Experts 30 100 3000
Contract expertise       2500
Catering for meetings       250
Project management   25 75 250
 
subtotal definition phase: 10850
 
Design phase
 
Travel costs Team Members     1000
Design sketch Designer 60 60 3600
Design presentation Designer 20 60 1200
Materials       2000
Web presentation
Content Content 20 60 1200
HTML Programmer 20 65 1300
Design Designer 30 60 1800
Project management   15 75 1125
 
    subtotal design phase: 13225
Preparation phase
 
Travel costs       2000
Material costs       15000
Elaboration of schedules Project Leader 40 75 3000
Project management   15 75 1125
 
subtotal preparation phase: 22125
 
Implementation phase
 
Travel costs (personnel)       2000
Material transport costs       3000
Operations (internal personnel) Carpenters 160 45 7200
  Plumbers 160 50 8000
  Designers 80 65 5200
Temporary workers       25000
Gas, water, electricity       3000
Project management   80 75 6000
 
subtotal implementation phase: 59400
 
Follow-up phase
 
Travel costs (personnel)       2000
Material disposal       3000
Material clean-up project team 40 60 2400
Final report Project Leader 40 75 3000
Accountant�s statement       1000
Project management   40 75 3000
 
subtotal follow-up: 15900
 
Summary
 
subtotal initiation phase: 6950
subtotal definition phase: 10850
subtotal design phase: 13225
subtotal preparation phase: 22125
subtotal implementation phase: 59400
subtotal follow-up: 15900
 
subtotal: 128450
unexpected costs 10% 13495
 
total: 141945
 
This budget is a global estimate of the entire <project name>. project. At the beginning of each new phase, a detailed budget for that phase is delivered.

Appendix 12: Sample financial statement

Financial report
<Project name>
<Name of the person compiling this document>
<date>
Amount in Euros
Initiation phase Who? Budgeted hours Actual hours Fee Total budgeted Actual total expenditures
Research draft Project Leader 20 23 75 1500 1725
Consultation with partners Project Leader 10 12 75 750 900
Preparation of project proposal Department Head 40 35 80 3200 2800
Proposal design Graphic Design 10 20 50 500 1000
Contract expertise 1000 1000 980
Unexpected costs 861
subtotal initiation phase: 6950 7405
Definition phase
Consultation with end users Project Leader 10 10 75 750 750
Functional designer 10 10 65 650 650
Consultation with experts Project Leader 20 18 75 1500 1350
Functional designer 30 35 65 1950 2275
Internal experts 30 40 100 3000 4000
Contract expertise 2500 2700
Catering for meetings 250 247
Project management 25 41 75 250 3075
Unexpected costs 120
subtotal definition phase: 10850 15167
Design phase
Travel costs Team members 1000 1221
Design sketch Designer 60 63 60 3600 3780
Design presentation Designer 20 19 60 1200 1140
Materials 2000 1873
Web presentation
Content Copy writer 20 18 60 1200 1080
Html Programmer 20 32 65 1300 2080
Design Designer 30 18 60 1800 1080
Project management 15 12 75 1125 900
Unexpected costs 120
subtotal design phase: 13225 14399
Development phase
Travel costs 2000 1200
Material costs 15000 13981
Elaborating schedules Project Leader 40 45 75 3000 3375
Project management 15 22 75 1125 1650
Unexpected costs 11003
subtotal development phase: 22125 31209
Implementation phase
Travel costs (personnel) 2000 2100
Costs for material transport 3000 2850
Operations (internal personnel) carpenters 160 200 45 7200 9000
plumbers 160 165 50 8000 8250
designers 80 75 65 5200 4875
Temporary workers 25000 24560
Gas, water, electricity 3000 3800
Project management 80 81 75 6000 1650
Unexpected costs 231
subtotal implementation phase: 59400 57316
Follow-up phase
Travel costs (personnel) 2000 1642
Material disposal 3000 3500
Material clean-up Project team 40 45 60 2400 2700
Final report Project Leader 40 40 75 3000 3000
Accountant’s statement 1000 981
Project management 40 62 75 3000 4650
Unexpected costs 861
subtotal follow-up: 15900 17334
Summary
subtotal initiation phase: 6950 7405
subtotal definition phase: 10850 15167
subtotal design phase: 13225 14399
subtotal development phase: 22125 31209
subtotal implementation phase: 59400 57316
subtotal follow-up: 15900 17334
unexpected costs 10% 13495 14321
total: 141945 157151
This financial report should be accompanied by a brief analysis of the largest differences between the budget estimate and actual costs.

Literature

Chromatic and Diaz, T. Apandi (Ed.) (2003). Extreme Programming Pocket Guide. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly & Associates.

Goldratt, E.M. (2002). De zwakste schakel. Utrecht: Het Spectrum.

Kor, R. and Wijnen, G. (2002). 50 checklisten voor project- en programmamanagement. Deventer: Kluwer.

Kroll, P. and Kruchten, Ph. (2004). The Rational Unified Process Made Easy: A practitioner’s Guide to the RUP. Boston: Addison Wesley.

McConnell, S. (1996). Rapid Development: Taming Wild Software Schedules. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press.

Stapleton, J. (2002). DSDM Dynamic Systems Development Method: De methode in de praktijk. Schoonhoven: Academic Service.

Wijnen, G., Renes, W. and Storm, P. (2004). Projectmatig werken. Utrecht: Het Spectrum.

Internet sources

[i] Spolsky, J. (2000). Painless Functional Specifications – Part 1: Why Bother? Referred to 31 May, 2006 http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000036.html

[ii] Why power your site with XP? (z.j.). Referred to 31 May, 2006 via http://www.XP.com/

[iii] Extreme Programming: A gentle introduction (Last modified February 17, 2006). Referred to 31 May, 2006 via http://www.extremeprogramming.org/

[iv] Spolsky, J. (2000). WhatTimeIsIt.com. Functional Specification. Referred to 31 May, 2006 via http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/WhatTimeIsIt.html

[v] Spolsky, J. (2002). Fire And Motion. Referred to 31 May 2006 via http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000339.html

[vi] Pair Programming successes and failures (2001-2003). Referred to 31 May, 2006 via http://discuss.fogcreek.com/joelonsoftware/default.asp?cmd=show&ixPost=2058